RSS

Tag Archives: Author interviews

Fantasy Glossary for Aegis of the Gods

So after resisting for a while and being told by some that they understood most things about my world, I gave in to some who didn’t. I want each reader to grasp the majority of how my world works, and though I’ve worked hard to not info dump and to show my world and how the magic works, some might find certain things hard to grasp. I am partially to blame for this because I do drop quite a bit of the world’s names early in the story and more often than not, the explanation comes in the subsequent chapters. Does every book need a glossary? No. But I have now agreed with some of my readers, that some parts of my world is so involving, and that I use much of that within my world early enough in the book, that a glossary would only help rather than hinder. With no further ado, and thank you again, readers and fans. Here’s the glossary so far for the Aegis of the Gods series. It has been included in the newest edition of the book as of last night.

If there’s something you would like to see added. Please drop a comment. I’ll see what I can do.

GLOSSARY

Alzari – Matii who wield mostly the Forms, strongest in earth essences and metal. Ancestors of the Setian.

Amuni – One of the gods of Streams, specifically, shade. Brother of Ilumni.

Ashishin – Matii who serve the Tribunal and often represent the god Ilumni and the Streams, specifically light and heat. Most of the Granadian peoples are descendants of the Ashishin. They often bear the title of Shin or High Shin.

Astoca – A kingdom within south central Ostania. Their people, the Astocans, are cousins to the Cardians. (See Namazzi)

Bana – A kingdom in eastern Ostania. Their people are the Banai and worship Humelen and the Forms.

Bastions of Light – Towers along the Vallum of Light and located at strategic points within Granadia that can be used to send warning of an impending attack to the Tribunal.

Cardia – A kingdom far south in Ostania. Their people, the Cardians, are related to the Astocans. (See Namazzi)

construct – A sentient entity created from essences.

Dagodin – A Matus who cannot Forge but can wield items imbued with Mater called divya.

Darkwraith – A type of shadeling created by merging the sela essences, spirit, and shade of a Matus.

dartan – A massive beast of burden, bigger than any horse. It has 6 legs, hardened skin, and a shell into which it can withdraw its legs. It also has a long snake-like neck and is a meat eater. Originally created during the Luminance Wars.

Deathbringer – A type of Matii used by the Felani and others, said to be already crazed Matii. Only the Felani know how they’re controlled.

Denestia – The world where this story takes place, said to have been the crowning achievement of the god Ilumni who defeated his brother Amuni for its possession.

Devout – A priest who serves Ilumni and goes on pilgrimages to do the Tribunal’s bidding, often preaching the word of Streamean worship and its virtues.

divya – An item imbued with Mater.

Dosteri – A race originating in Everland who later inhabited Granadia.

Elements of Mater – The completed essences that make up the Flows, the Forms, and the Streams. (See Mater)

Erastonia – A kingdom in Everland.

Erastonian – Powerful warriors from Everland, specifically from a place called Erastonia. They possess some of the strongest Matii within the known world. Their main task is defending the Great Divide and killing any shadelings that happen to escape from the prisons contained with the Divide.

Essences – The individual strands of power that make up the elements of Mater.

Everland – The northernmost continent in Denestia.

Exalted – Mythical leaders of the Tribunal.

Eztezian – The Eztezians were the descendants of the gods. Great warriors and the most powerful Matii to grace Denestia. They were tasked with protecting Denestia from the shade and from itself. Driven mad by their overuse of Mater however, they almost destroyed the world. They created the Great Divide, which brought about the shade’s defeat. Then they turned on the gods, sealing them in the Nether to prevent future wars and the creation of more creatures like the shadelings.

Felan – A kingdom is western Ostania. Their people are known as the Felani.

Flowic – The religions named after the elements of Flows and its gods.

Flows – The combination of two essences—primarily water and air that make up liquids known as the Flows. There are other variations that involve other essences. E.g Water and cold to form ice. Heat, air, and something flammable to create fire.

Forger – A Matus who can Forge essences of Mater

Forging – See Materforging

Formist – The religion named after the elements of Forms and its gods.

Forms – The combination of three essences—earth, metal, and wood, that make up solids known as the Forms. There are other variations of solids that can be enhanced by using other essences, as well as other essences not in this umbrella that can be used to form solids. (See example in Streams.)

Gerde – Stoneform beasts with eight-legs that bear similarities to crabs, but were the size of ponies.

Granadia – The Western continent of Denestia. Have been at conflict with most of Ostania for millenia.

Harna – A kingdom in northern Ostania. Followers of Formist religion. Descendants of the Sven.

Humelen – One of the Gods of Forms, specifically earth.

Hydae – A world formed by Amuni when he lost to his brother Ilumni.

Ilumni – One of the gods of Streams, specifically, light. Brother of Amuni.

Imbuer – A Matus who can imbue properties of essences into an item to create divya.

kinai – A special plant that draws on essences, used in many healing formulas and potent drinks. Said to enhance the user’s strength, stamina, and agility.

Luminance War – An ancient war when shadelings escaped the Great Divide and swept across Ostania.

Mater – Mater is the core elemental power which exists within everything. It makes up the three elements the gods represent and their individual essences. Mater drives all worlds. The three elements are the solids of the Forms, the liquids of the Flows, and the energy of the Streams. Those are further broken down into separate essences. For instance, earth, wood and metal are a part of the Forms. Heat, cold, light and shade are a part of the Streams. Water and air are a part of the Flows. Finally, there’s sela essence, a combination of life and death which sits outside the three elements and is required for anything to live or die. (See Streams, Flows, Forms.)

Materialize – Ability to Forge a portal between two places for travel.

Materforging – The act of wielding the essences or elements of Mater.

Matersense – The ability to open up one’s mind to be able to sense or see nearby essences within the elements of Mater.

Matus – One who can sense Mater (Plural – Matii) Not every Matus can manipulate or Forge Mater. What essence a Matus is strongest in is often determined by bloodline. However, one can train to become adept in other essences. It is difficult and takes powerful Matii to wield essences from two separate elements simultaneously. It is considered to only be an ability of the netherlings or gods to wield all essences within all three elements at the same time.

Mystera – Schools built throughout Granadia for the purpose of teaching and recruiting Matii.

Namazzi – Matii who wield mostly the Flows, ancestors of the Cardians and Astocans.

Netherling – Primordial beings from the Nether, said to have been the ones to bestow their power on the Eztezians in order to save the world. This act was part of their revenge against the gods for their experiments.

Ostania – The Eastern continent of Denestia. Have been at conflict with most of Ostania for millenia.

Pathfinder – Powerful Matii, trained by the Tribunal, who have passed the ultimate tests of control over their emotions, which ensure they will not succumb to the temptations of the power the essences promise. They are used to hunt Matii who break the laws governing the use of Forging or those who go insane. They often accompany Ashishin to protect the Ashishin from attackers and from themselves.

Raijin – An elite assassin corps within the Tribunal.

Sanctums of Shelter – Similar to the Bastions of Light but more powerful and arrayed along the mountains in Northern Granadia to protect from any direct incursion by the shade through the Great Divide.

Scorpio – A massive crossbow–type weapon that fires large metal projectiles.

Senjin – A sport played with a leather ball, featuring 14 combatants, 7 per side, on a field spilt into 6 parts, with two halves. The team to score three times first, wins.

Seti – A kingdom in north western Ostania. Their people the Setian are descendants of the Alzari. (See Alzari)

Shadelings – Creatures created in the God Wars, primarily by the god Amuni, and his followers by experimenting with netherlings and the essence of shade. The effects of the couplings can be seen within some of the strange beasts within Denestia.

Shin – The respectful title given to Ashishin Matii.

Shunyata – A place within each person where they can separate and control their emotions. Also the place where sela essence is stored within any living being. Also known as the Eye.

Streamean – The religion named after the elements of Streams and its gods.

Streams – The combination of four essences—light, heat, cold, and shade that make up energy. The energy can be used in the forming of the other elements e.g cold is needed to form ice which is part of the Forms and part of the Flows.

Sven – The earth elemental peoples that inhabit the Nevermore Mountains in north eastern Ostania. Descendants of the Svenzar.

Svenzar – Form elementals that reside in mountainous areas. Their power resides in earth, metal, and wood.

The Aegis – Said to be a power or a person who would help either protect the gods or defend against their resurgence.

The Chronicles – Said to be sacred tomes written by the Eztezians themselves and their descendants, dictating the past and the future of the world.

The Disciplines – A set of rules and pointers on how to govern and lead soldiers.

The Eye – See Shunyata.

The Great Divide – A massive rift in the land created by the Eztezians to defeat the shadelings. It runs from north to south across central Everland, and is guarded by the Erastonians.

The Iluminus – Named after the god Ilumni, it is the central city, learning hub and home of the Tribunal and its Matii.

The Nether – A realm between the worlds thought to be the origination of Mater, the gods, and netherlings.

The Stone – The great hidden city where the Svenzar and Sven live in northern Ostania.

The Unvanquished – Stefan Dorn’s elite troops in Ostania.

Travelshaft – Tunnels developed by the Svenzar using the Forms, where time is slowed and speed increased to allow travel between large distances in a small amount of time. Said to somehow be constructed between the Planes of Existence.

Tribunal – The founding society of Ashishin among the Matii. They determined what was needed for the Matii as a whole to function in their proper roles as protectors and mediators. Eventually, the different Matii split apart due to conflicts in ideals, philosophies and religions. The Tribunal rules in Granadia. They left Ostania where most of the other Matii fled, to fend for themselves.

Vallum of Light – A massive wall imbued with Mater and erected by Eztezians within the Tribunal to separate Ostania from Granadia.

Warping – A Forging by powerful Matii, using the sela essences of something recently killed, to twist the essences in a specific area, thus rendering them unusable for a period of time.

Wraithwolf – A type of shadeling using a combination of wolf or other canine type beast, as well as the sela of a person, and essences of shade.

Zar – The respectful title given to Alzari Matii.

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Deathspeaker – New Fantasy novel

This is an excerpt from my newest WIP that I started today. A nice little tease if I do say so myself. It’s set in Denestia but several thousand years after the current events in Aegis of the Gods.

Deathspeaker

 

When the dead spoke to Marius, he listened. Not that he often had much choice. They were persistent that way. And annoying.

Today, they’d told him whom he needed to visit here in the city of Pante. They seemed to enjoy these trips and the ensuing results as much as trying to goad him to take the power they offered without the necessary protection. He always resisted no matter how enticing he found the proposition. After all, if he partook of their temptation, one like himself would be paying him a visit, maybe even his own brother. If that happened, someone would die.

He smiled. What a dilemma. Tricky bastards.

For a moment, he waited for their agitated whispers in rebuke of his thoughts. He cocked an eyebrow when none came. Unusual for them considering they were as pompous and overbearing as most monarchs. Still no response. Not even a muted rustling in his head. He frowned as he stored that tidbit of information.

His old mentor would have scolded him for considering the voices to be something as mundane as the dead. Master Dorn would have said they were the murmurs of the essences that made up the world. Marius found it easier to accept them as random lost spirits able to speak in his mind. Much simpler than to believe the rainbow bands and swirls of color he saw, which represented the essences, were somehow alive. Talking colors. Imagine that. He gave a derisive snort.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Character Interview: Aeon of The Between

Terry: Who are you?

Aeon: I am Aeon. Oberon calls me his mad gardener, but I don’t belong to him. He may have bound me here, but he doesn’t know everything about me. Come, walk with me a bit, but mind your step. My pets can be clingy.

Terry: Where do you live?

Aeon: Why here, in the maze. Is it not a wondrous place? Even I don’t know all its twists and turns.

Terry: Are you the hero of your own story?

Aeon: Oh, you are an amusing fellow. All stories are my story. My roots go back to the very beginning of Fairie. And I am an old tree, indeed. You could even say that Lydia’s story is just a continuation of my own, even if she does not yet realize it. If my trees could talk, they would tell you stories that would hold you spellbound, lost within Faerie. Lucky for you, they are sleepy today.

Terry: How do your friends see you?

Aeon: Until Lydia wandered into my maze, I had not understood how someone with power could offer friendship. We have so long been bound by our hatreds, our petty jealousies. I think Lydia is my friend. It is dangerous to offer such a precious gift to the Fae, and I fear for her. If that means I am her friend, then yes, it must be so.

Terry: How do your enemies see you?

Aeon: That is a much more interesting question. Oberon sees a broken, beaten little man, his power contained in a maze he thinks he created. I let him believe his lovely Faerie tale because it suits me. I wasn’t always his tame gardener. But the green and growing things here have always been my allies. Oberon would do well to remember that.

Terry: How does the author see you? Do you think the author portrayed you accurately?

Aeon: She is an interesting one. I think she sees me as clearly as anyone Mortal can, though perhaps that is unfair. Just because she is ephemeral does not mean her vision is wrong, only limited. She is beginning to be troubled by dreams of my past. Perhaps once, she thought of me as benign, a rare ally for her Lydia, but now she understands that like my garden itself, I am wild and twisted. It will not be easy for her to find my story, but now that it has started to take root inside her, well, I suspect I know how this will end.

Terry: What do you regret?

Aeon: The Fae have no regrets. We are creatures of impulse and power. If there is something we desire, either we take it or will it into being. And yet, I envy Lydia. She is so refreshing in her loyalty. If I regret anything, it is that I cannot give her back that which Oberon has stolen.

Terry: Have you ever betrayed anyone?

Aeon: Have you learned nothing about the Fae? Do not place your trust in us, Mortal. All the stories you tell your littles about us and you still don’t understand. We are not bound by such relationships as you prize. We take lovers, but without the childish expectation of love that you chase all your brief lives. You speak of betrayal as if it were some terrible offense. To us, it is merely another turn in a game of power.

Terry: Do you keep your promises?

Aeon: Ah, well that is a different story. What I bind my name to, takes a payment, a tithe if you will. And if I break that oath, I will forfeit a part of myself. We take our word seriously; it is our very selves. You Mortals, who talk of the pain of betrayal, you break your word without thought, without consequence. For all the centuries I have known the ephemerals, this I will never understand. Raised among you as she was, Lydia still understands the weight of a promise, though it would be easier for her if she did not.

Terry: What is your favorite scent? Why?

Aeon: The scent of a just ripe peach. At the heart of my maze, there is a garden. At the heart of that garden, is my peach tree. It is the oldest tree in Faerie and its fruit reminds me of my life before this punishment. The only time the thorns do not torment me is when I am beneath its boughs.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on January 25, 2012 in Announcements, Authors, Characters, Interviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

GIR 12 Days of New Year blog hop: Author Interview: Jonathan Gould

Say hi today to Jonathan Gould as part of the GIR 12 Days of New Year blog hop!  Jonathan is the author of Doodling.

Terry C. Simpson: How long had the idea of your book been developing before you began to write the story?

Jonathan Gould: Not really very long at all. I just happened to be in that mood where I was looking for a story to write. I’d just completed a year of studying creative writing and was really tired of doing writing for classwork assignments rather than writing for myself.

It must have been around 10-11-ish at night when my wife made a comment about how she felt the world was moving so quickly. That got me going. I’m not sure I had a lot of sleep that night. My brain just wouldn’t stop. What would happen of the world was moving so quickly that somebody actually fell off?

The next morning, early on, I was sitting at the computer, writing what at that point was little more than a short piece about a man falling off the world. I had no idea at that point that it would actually turn into something more. It felt to me like I was just doing a bit of Doodling, but of the literary kind, rather than the drawing kind. That’s why I decided, when this strange little piece actually evolved into a genuine story, I decided to retain the title Doodling.

Terry C. Simpson: How much of yourself is hidden in the characters in the book?

Jonathan Gould: I suspect there’s an awful lot of me in all of the characters that I write.

Neville Lansdowne (the main character – the one who actually falls off the world) is very much like me. A quiet sort of person who spends a lot of time wondering around, observing things, and never quite understanding what is going on. Then again, Neville seems a lot better at organising people than I am. He actually manages to get people to pay attention which is something I’ve always struggled with.

I can also see myself in most of the other characters in the story. Their irrationality is something I can definitely relate to. Like the Toaster People, I’m sure if I was marooned on an asteroid in the middle of nowhere, I’d also have a totally illogical need for some sort of appliance that I’d really have no use for. And like the Aimless Girl, I do spend a lot of time being led from here to there without any sense of where I’m going.

Terry C. Simpson: How do you develop and differentiate your characters?

Jonathan Gould: Writing characters is always one of the most enjoyable parts of writing to me. Especially when my characters are usually quite simple and clear – a bit like cartoon characters – where they often have a single defining characteristic.

Once I’ve figured out what that characteristic is, I’ll think about how that can best be expressed. It could be something about their appearance, or the clothes they’re wearing. But most likely it’s going to be in their speech. I’m a very wordy writer and writing dialogue is what I enjoy the most (coming from a sketch comedy background). It’s really important to me that each character has a unique voice. That could involve some catchphrases (like the “spoilsport/party pooper” used by the Party People) which are really fun to play around with and vary so they don’t get stale. But it’s also more generally in the things they say and the way they say them. I try to hear the dialogue in my head so I can get a sense of how each character sounds.

The other important thing about the characters is that each of them must have their part to play. Over the course of writing Doodling, I came with a bunch of characters I liked a lot, but who I eventually discarded as they did not have a role to play as the story developed.

Terry C. Simpson: Is there a message in your writing you want readers to grasp?

Jonathan Gould: Apparently there is according to most of the reviews I’ve had. It’s funny because as a writer I definitely don’t try to put messages into my writing. I just think of ideas that interest or amuse me (like a man falling off the world). I think because the ideas I work with are so rich, the “messages” just seem to emerge naturally. For example, most readers suggest that Doodling is about getting away from the hustle and bustle of modern life and taking time to enjoy the little things. And they’re not wrong. I’d be lying if I claimed that I was totally ignorant of the presence of these “messages” but they’re not the primary motivator for my writing.

Ultimately, what is important to me is story. Getting readers engaged and involved through strong characters and a clever, well-constructed plot (as well as a few laughs), are what matters most. If readers want to pull more out of what I have written, then I know that I’ve managed to create something that has a bit of depth to it, which makes me feel like I’ve really achieved something as a writer.

Terry C. Simpson: Do you have any rituals that you follow before sitting down to write?

Jonathan Gould: One very powerful ritual. It’s called procrastination. I’ll spend lots of time doing other things, avoiding the actual writing. Often I’ll go back and read a bunch of other things I’ve written. I claim it’s to get me into the right frame of mind for writing. I could be lying to myself. Ultimately, writing can be a bit frightening. What if that idea that was so great in your head is crap once it’s on the page? Sometimes you don’t want to know.

Terry C. Simpson: Are you writing to reach a particular kind of reader?

Jonathan Gould: One with lots of money and an insatiable appetite for books.

Seriously, I suspect my “ideal reader” is someone a lot like me. Someone who enjoys a laugh, doesn’t take themselves too seriously and spends a lot of time being confused about how little sense the world in general makes.

My experience is that people like that can be any age and either gender. There’s a lot of them around. I just need to figure out where they’re all hiding.

Terry C. Simpson: What is the most difficult part of the whole writing process?

Jonathan Gould: As I mentioned previously, I think the hardest bit is trying to translate the ideas in your head into something that works on the page. My brother-in-law pointed me to a great Lou Reed lyric – “Between thought and expression lies a lifetime”. I think it sums it up beautifully. You can have the greatest idea in your head but if you can’t figure out how to express it on the page, whether that’s through characters, description or dialogue, then it’s just not going to work.

It’s about communication. You have to get the best bits of the idea in your head into a form that will put it into the heads of your readers.

Terry C. Simpson: Do you have mental list or a computer file or a spiral notebook with the ideas for or outlines of stories that you have not written but intend to one day?

Jonathan Gould: I have so many notebooks filled with lists of thoughts and ideas, I’m pretty close to needing a separate notebook to list out all of those other notebooks. Ideas always come and go. I’ve lost some pretty good ones over the years. And some pretty bad ones won’t leave me alone. Alas for the difficulties of the creative life.

Terry C. Simpson: Who gave you the best writing advice you ever received and what was it?

Jonathan Gould: This is where I get to quote my hero, Douglas Adams. It’s in a wonderful, non-fiction book he wrote called Last Chance to See where he and a zoologist went around the world searching for endangered species (and goddamn it, that’s exactly why I want to be a famous writer too).

At one point, they were traveling with some German backpackers who so fit the stereotype of what you’d expect German backpackers to be like (ruthlessly efficient and scornful of all others) that Adams became quite upset – he felt that as a writer, you should never reinforce stereotypes. So he didn’t. He decided they weren’t German, they were Latvian, and described them as such for the rest of the book.

Anyway, that’s a round-about way for getting to the actual advice. Never reinforce stereotypes. It’s a rule I try to follow – when I feel like my characters (or ideas) are veering into cliché, I’ll always try to work out a way to subvert them.

And a bit of extra advice – read Last Chance to See – you won’t regret it.

Terry C. Simpson: Have you written any other books

Jonathan Gould: Yes.

I have had two children’s stories published as school readers – titled A Right Royal Day and Madoop and the Mountain Mower. They’re both about short kings but unfortunately I don’t think they’re generally available – certainly not on Amazon.

In addition to Doodling, I have another self-published ebook titled Flidderbugs. It’s kind of a fable/satire and again, I’d by lying if I said I didn’t think there was a message there.  But mostly, it’s meant to be a funny story about a bunch of insects with some strange obsessions.

Am I also allowed to mention upcoming work? I have a novel I’m planning to publish soon (Doodling and Flidderbugs are more novella length). It’s called Magnus Opum and is a kind of epic fantasy with a twist. I like to describe it as Tolkien meets Dr Seuss.

Terry C. Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

Jonathan Gould: At my blog: http://daglit.blogspot.com

 And at my sell pages:

DOODLING:

 Amazon

Amazon UK

Smashwords 

Barnes and Noble

FLIDDERBUGS:

 Amazon

Amazon UK

Smashwords

Barnes and Noble

Thank you so much  for doing this interview, Jonathan. You can connect with Jonathan on facebook or twitter.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Fantasy Author Interview: M. Edward McNally

Yes, yes, today I have the pleasure of interviewing a guy who always manages to make me laugh in the facebook groups we are in. Not only that but he’s an author of epic fantasy, M. Edward McNally. As a double treat, I also got to interview his character Matilda Lanai from his Musket & Magic Fantasy, the Norothian Cycle. (The Sable City, Death of a Kingdom, The Wind from Miilark)

Terry Simpson: What is your book about?

M. Edward McNally: Muskets, Magic, and Matilda Lanai. 😉

Terry Simpson: How long had the idea of your book been developing before you began to write the story?

M. Edward McNally: Hard to say.  For about a ten year period I had stopped writing fiction, but during that time I had a “world-building” hobby.  Just on a lark, I sort of designed a primitive world where magic functioned as much as technology, and made my way through several centuries of cultural, political, and economic evolution.  It was kind of like a game of “Civilization” I played in my head.

While my intention was not to write a series of Musket & Magic Fantasy books, or even one book set in my world, a few years ago some of the people “living” there started talking to me. I didn’t have a choice after that, as Tilda Lanai is kind of pushy. 😉

Terry Simpson: What inspired you to write this particular story?

M. Edward McNally: This story specifically started to roil because of two different images I got in my head.  The first was of a lone young woman on a grassy steppe, under a gray sky.  She was walking slowly toward a wounded warhorse, holding out a bright red apple in one hand.  That turned out to be Tilda.

The other image was of a samurai and a Roman Legionnaire fighting shoulder-to-shoulder to hold a foot bridge against an army.  Not geographically or temporally possible in the real world, of course, but an image that stuck with me, and inspired two supporting characters.

Terry Simpson: Tell us a little about your main characters. Who was your favorite? Why?

M. Edward McNally: My favorite is Tilda Lanai, as she would not let me say anything else.  The story, and series, are complex, with several diverging plotlines moving in time with the main one, but Tilda is the central figure around which the others depend.  It really is her story, I’m just writing it down.

Terry Simpson: Who is your most unusual/most likeable character?

M. Edward McNally: Not sure how “likability” factors in, but for me the most unusual is a sorceress named Nesha-tari, who is half-Lamia.  On her mother’s side.  You know: Attract men, then eat them to live.  She is also however half-human, so her efforts to live with herself while doing what she must to stay alive were interesting for me to try and handle as a writer, and hopefully will be the same for readers.

Terry Simpson: How much of a story do you have in mind before you start writing it?

M. Edward McNally: I’m a “pantser” as a writer and a believer in character first.  Once I know (or think I know) who the players are, and what they want, I basically start writing just to find out for myself how they get to where they are going.  Of course that means the re-writing/editing stage is critical for me, to make sure there is a story being told.

Terry Simpson: How has your background influenced your writing?

M. Edward McNally: Though I am writing in the Fantasy genre, the motifs are probably less “Medieval European” than is typical.  There are as many Polynesian, Central American, and Asian influences to the cultures involved.  This may be the result of being a “mutt” myself: A half-Irish/half-Mexican from the US “South.”

Terry Simpson: Have you ever had difficulty “killing off” a character in your story because she or he was so intriguing and full of possibility for you, his or her creator?

M. Edward McNally: Totally.  I wrote one of these series books completely convinced a particular character was going to die at the end.  They wouldn’t go down.  Bent the plot significantly in a direction I did not think it was going to go, but actually when things like that happen they are some of my greatest joys as a writer.

Terry Simpson: Have you written any other books

M. Edward McNally: In addition to the fantasy series, I have a number of short story collections (mostly of the “contemporary” genre) available for free from most retailers (though a couple are still 99 cents on Amazon.  They are all titled “Eddie’s Shorts – Volume #.”

Terry Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

M. Edward McNally: Easiest place is on my blog at. http://sablecity.wordpress.com/

That is both the homepage for the series, where additional background materials (maps, glossary, histories) can be seen, as well as the place where I mumble about writing, interview fellow authors (every Tag Line Tuesday) and the like.

———————————-

Without further ado, meet Tilda Lanai

Terry Simpson: Who are you?

Tilda Lanai: Who am I?  You asked me here, right?  Sorry.  I’m Matilda Lanai, but my friends call me Tilda.  Actually, everybody calls me Tilda.

Terry Simpson: Where do you live?

Tilda Lanai: The port of Souterm, in the Empire of the Code, at the moment.  Though that’s mainly because I can’t go home to the Islands right away until some issues with my Trade House…or former Trade House, anyway…get worked out.  Also, I’m sort of moving around a bit here in town as there is this detective of the City Watch who thinks I murdered a gem merchant. Which I did not do.  I *did* try to sell him a necklace with a Devil’s Curse on it, but…it’s kind of a long story, actually.

Terry Simpson: Are you the hero of your own story?

Tilda Lanai: Everybody is the hero of their own story. (wink)

Terry Simpson: What is your problem in the story?

Tilda Lanai: Oh, to have just one!  That would be wonderful!  But really, since I arrived on the mainland about a year ago, I’ve had any number of problems.  Or at least, I’ve made friends with people who have problems, which for me is the same thing.  If you are my friend and you have a problem, it is my problem, too.

Terry Simpson: Do you embrace conflict? / Do you run from conflict?

Tilda Lanai: Neither.  I find it easier to sneak up behind conflict and whack it in the head with a club.

Terry Simpson: How do your friends see you?

Tilda Lanai: I hope they know that I mean it when I say they are my friend.  Where I am from, the Miilark Islands, we don’t give friendship away that easily.  It means something to us when we do, and it’s for life.

Terry Simpson: How do your enemies see you?

Tilda Lanai: Again, I’d prefer they didn’t see me coming.

Terry Simpson: Do you have a hero?

Tilda Lanai: I did, he…um…he didn’t make it.  It’s kind of hard to talk about, wasn’t that long ago.  Sorry.

Terry Simpson: What is your favorite item of clothing? Why?

My Guild Cloak.  I trained as a Guilder in the service of House Deskata for three years, and the cloak is sort of the sign of that, for an Islander.  It’s black, which is handy at night, and the inner lining of emerald green represents my House…or what was my House, rather.  Nice triangular cut, too, so I can get my hands inside in case I need…anything that it otherwise conceals.

Also, as I technically left the Islands a month before completing Guild training, this wasn’t a graduation gift.  I had to buy it myself, and I am *not* taking that as a loss, even when it gets…um…soiled.

Terry Simpson: Do you keep your promises?

Tilda Lanai: Always.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dannye Williamsen – Author and Great Supporter of Indie Authors

Dannye Williamsen

This morning I was talking with a woman, Terry, who expressed that familiar adage that everyone has a book in them. It made me wonder what that really means. Some writers, I think, are driven because they have a mythical tale to unfold while others have an account from their lives to share. Still others are driven more by the message conveyed within their story. So I asked myself: what kind of book did I have in me?

The answer was that I am not driven by the creation of imaginary worlds or sharing my life experiences in fiction or nonfiction formats. I am driven by two things: 1) creating a story that allows me to share a message that is important to me; and 2) being able to step into the magical world of putting words together in just the right way to create a desired effect.

Using words to accomplish a goal has always been a part of my life, whether verbally as a manager, a technical analyst, or a coach or in written form as a nonfiction and fiction writer or as an editor. Dealing with facts and helping people increase their knowledge base has always been rewarding. I do have to admit, however, that the more sober venues do not compare to the wild abandon that you can experience when letting your imagination loose when you write fiction!

Writing my novels was akin to a mystical experience for me. I became so enveloped by each character’s life that I cried, laughed, and suffered along with them to the point that I often had to walk away from the writing for short periods because my emotional state felt under siege by what was happening to my character!

Second Chances is my debut novel, and it is followed by the sequel The Threads That Bind. Because of my strong belief in our potential as humans to reach a level of expression that goes way beyond the physical, it was not surprising to me that my novels would delve into the metaphysical to weave a story of suspense. Nor was it a surprise that my protagonist in Second Chances would reach deep within herself to find a solution that was responsive to the circumstances and not arising out of fear or conditioning. It was gratifying to read Sylvia Massara’s remark in her review of Second Chances:  “—in the end I came away feeling inspired and opening my heart to the fact that love truly does conquer all.”

My nonfiction works are about the process each of us has to experience as we seek to reach that potential I mentioned. Internal change leads to external change. In one of my books, I say this: “Your life is always under construction. It is your job to learn how to untangle the threads and weave a tapestry that matches your desires.” Learning to do this is what all my nonfiction writing is about, whether it focuses on one’s business or personal life.

As I became involved with the self-publishing industry through Facebook, I saw a need to have a place where readers could look at only self-published works, and so I established an online bookstore early in 2011: http://www.BreakthroughBookstore.com. The bookstore is not a statement about traditionally-published books. It is simply meant to provide a venue where the works of self-published authors can be more easily located by readers who are hungry to discover new writers. I provide reviews at my discretion and feature books that are brought to my attention in the marketplace. I also choose an Editor’s Choice book, which represents the best of the best that I have read among self-published books.

My novels, and most of my nonfiction works are available on Breakthrough Bookstore, of course  J, but they can also be found on Amazon.com. In addition, you can go to http://www.WilliamsenPublications.com to view and purchase all my books.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Terry Persun – A few Ideas about why I write

Today, we the book has been turned over to the hands of Terry Persun. Author of several novels and winner of the Star of Washington Award and a ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year finalist.

I carry several ideas for novels around in my head, with half a dozen voices or more clamoring for my attention. This goes on year after year, and has been happening to me for as long as I can remember. Often, an idea will be rattling around up there for more than a year before I actually sit down and begin writing. Sometimes it’ll take three or four years for everything in my head to work itself out. For me, the character has to come through with a name and a back story already in place. At that time, I will know the beginning of the novel, a few important events, and the end of the novel. That’s when I begin to write.

As for research, I find that I’ve been reading certain types of material, or have an interest in delving into subjects, that eventually lead to a portion of a novel or short story. I live my life and follow my interests at the time, but will use everything I find. If specific information needs to be looked up, I do that while working on the novel. I also tear sheet articles, and print pieces from the Internet, if they feel as though they are attached to one of the ideas running loose in my head.

Writing starts when I wake up one morning, usually early, like 4:00 or so, and my main character’s voice will be in my head. That when I start. Once I get under way, the first draft of the novel comes fairly quickly. I write a minimum of 1000 words per day, so in 90 or so days, I can easily have a 90,000 to 125,000 word first draft. But first drafts need work, so I let the book sit for a month or more. During this time, I’ll either start another novel, or I’ll write short stories or poems. I can keep several items going at any one time, so that has never been a problem for me. The book itself has such a strong and powerful feel that I can’t ruin it once it’s written. Typically, though, I only do two or three rewrites, and some of those may be nothing more than touching up a scene or two.

A lot of my books have to do with personal freedom. It doesn’t matter what others want, or what they think, I want readers to make their own decisions, and know that it’s okay to do that. We live at a time where our natural instincts and reactions have been so toned down that we’re afraid to make changes in our lives “just because we want to.” It seems to me that many people need reasons to make a change, even if the reason has to be fabricated. I’m all for taking responsibility for my actions without having to explain them to the satisfaction of others. I’d like to see more people live that way.

Since my first book got published in the 90s, I’ve noticed how much more committed to the act I am. I also continue to read books about writing, and try out new techniques. The great thing about writing for a living is that you are always learning something new, whether it’s information that’s useful for the book itself, or techniques to try during the writing. I love the process, from concept to rewrite to final touch-up, so it’s always fun and interesting to me. My life is happier while I’m working on a project. Yet, the most surprising thing about being a writer is how little control you have over what the reader takes away. I’ve thought a book was about one thing, then realized that the readers found something else within the pages. It’s great to know that this sort of thing happens. It raises the writing to an art form, where interpretation belongs to the reader, not to me, the author.

As for promotion, I believe that exposing the work to as many potential readers is important, but that once that’s done there really isn’t a lot more an author can do. I mean we can, and often do, talk incessantly about our books, but the number one marketing tool in the U.S. is word of mouth. If a few people read my novel and recommend it to more people, and they recommend it, etc., etc. then the book will sell well. You just have to do your best work, have it professionally edited (which is what publishing houses do best), and get it out there.

You can get my latest novel, “Cathedral of Dreams” from Amazon or on Barnes and Noble.

You can also visit my site www.TerryPersun.com

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,