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Monthly Archives: October 2011

Nanowrimo 2011, I am Ready.

So this year, I’m all in for Nanowrimo. It’s almost an hour before it starts and I’m really excited. Last year, I wrote in the spirit of Nano to complete Etchings of Power. This year, I officially signed up and will be writing from scratch. One thing I’ve learned about my writing is that I’m a pantser. I don’t do well with outlines and when I’ve tried them I have almost always went a totally different path. Once I get my music going and my mind starts whirling, there’s no telling where I’ll end up.

Last year I did 75k words in completing my draft of Etchings. This year I intend to start Book 2, tentatively titled Uprising. At first, I was planning to do my prequel novel, Shade’s Forging. But for some reason Book 2 beckons. It keeps talking to me. It’s characters want me to tell their story.

Ancel has things to learn. Ryne has inner demons to fight. Irmina must face the pain and consequences of her decision. Galiana must strive to guide, despite the fact that much has been taken out of her hands and so much has changed. Sakari will make an even more prominent appearance. The people of Eldanhill now walk an unclear path full of obstacles to their survival. You will get to see the inner workings of the Tribunal and the shadow or light it casts over the world. There are battles to be fought, wars to start, kingdoms to rise or fall, deceptions and revelations, death and life.  And so much more.

So in great anticipation, I sit here, ideas spinning through my head, laptop before me in preparation for this adventure. One that I hope to make even better than Etchings.

I’m still not sure if I’ll post the chapters here as I do the work or not, because the draft will be so incredibly rough. But it sure is tempting. I will update my word count here, on facebook, on writing.com and of course on the nano site.

So cheer me on. A story is about to be told.

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A Brief History of Denestia

Denestia is a world in a vast universe created by a great God named the Aenead. Upon the universe’s construction the Aenead slumbered, separating his consciousness into several formless, divine beings which later became known as the gods that he tasked with populating the universe with planets and lifeforms. In all, there are 10 recognized gods, although more are said to exist. These gods were:

  1. gods of the Streams – Energy – Summer, Winter
  • Ilumni – light – Benevolence – the celestial bodies are his
  • Amuni – shade – Malevolence – the world of shadows is his
  • Bragni – Fire, heat – Passion, Anger, Fear
  • Rituni – Ice , cold – Indifference,
  1. gods of Forms – Solids – Autumn
  • Humelen – Earth – Steadfastness, Strength-
  • Liganen – Wood – Serenity, Flexibility –
  • Kinzanen – Metal – Suppleness, Understanding, Intelligence
  1. gods of Flows – Liquids – Spring
  • Hyzenki – Water – Calm, Control
  • Aeoli – Air – Gravity , Comedic, Levity
  1. god of Life and Death
  • Sela – Spirit – Regeneration, Memory

Within this universe, all worlds are separated by the Planes of Existence. The Planes are What If – The Futures, What Was – The Pasts, What Is – The Presents. There is also the Nether where the gods themselves reside. The Planes were separated by a barrier called the Kassite so one could not directly leak into the other. This same barrier exists between all worlds.

The gods went about their individual tasks creating worlds in their likenesses, but after a while they sought out each other, wanting to become the dominant force. During this period of infighting the gods used the elemental fabric that created the worlds to do battle. That elemental fabric is known as Mater. However, Mater wasn’t just some element to be used that resided within everything, it is made up of sentient beings, each representing the essences within the elements of Mater itself. Like any other being, these learned and grew and wanted more. Some developed malevolently while others followed more benevolent paths. Others stayed neutral.

As the Divine Wars raged, the essences came to understand one thing. With death came life and strength. In their own ways, they sought to gain a better understanding of themselves and strive toward achieving ultimate power, a power beyond what the gods that first wielded them could fathom.

During their war, the gods used the primordial lifeforms left for them by the Aenead within the Nether to help them govern their worlds. These beings came to be known as netherlings and possessed much of the same power as the gods. Eventually, the gods came to realize that none were gaining an upper hand and banded together. Yet even then, they destroyed more than they built. Seeking any way to gain victory, the gods began to use the netherlings to fight and left other guardians, descended from the gods themselves to monitor their worlds as they waged battle. Sick of seeing their kind ravaged, the netherlings turned to these guardians, the Eztezians, and offered them more power that combined with theirs, could put an end to the Divinity Wars.

This led to the gods being sealed with the Nether by the Eztezians themselves. In a last ditch effort, Amuni fled to his main world, Hydae, and using a special Forging, opened a rift to the Nether and used the netherlings to form creatures to combat the Eztezians. This was the formation of the first shadelings, and the beginning of the Shade Wars across all the worlds.

With the gods sealed away, the shadelings rampaged for millenia in Denestia before the Eztezians were able to cull them from the land, but at a price. The sentience within the essences had grown too strong, and their influence now corrupted Mater itself, making any who wielded it for too long succumb either to madness or death. The Eztezians themselves turned on mankind and brought about the Great Divide, destroying much of the world, but at the same time thrusting most of what remained of the shadelings into its vast recesses. They then separated part of Southern Denestia in half by use of a great wall called the Vallum of Light. This edifice was imbued with Mater and prevented any shadelings from crossing. This allowed the Eztezians and the peoples of Denestia to hunt down and destroy what remained of the shade. Thus, Northern Denestia came to be known as Everland, South Western Denestia as Granadia and South Eastern as Ostania.

As time passed, the remaining Eztezians and other peoples created by the gods gave birth to Denestia’s races as we know them now, many born with the ability to sense Mater around them when opened to the right influences  and trained correctly. Something the essences were only too ready to take advantage of.

For thousands of years now, war has raged across Denestia with one race against another, all under the influence of Mater. This was until a great Eztezian, Damal Adelfried, finally understood the motives behind the essences and realized a balance was needed. Thus came about the formation of the Tenets that govern Mater.

Eventually, unable to control their growing power any longer and not willing to see the destruction of all they’d come to love, the Eztezians turned on one another, many dying while others sealed themselves away from the world.

Within the time that followed, Denestia grew, going through the every day trials and tribulations of any normal world, from wars to empires to periods of tranquility. Then began the religious crusades.

This period lasted several thousand years until the Tribunal established itself. They claimed Granadia as their own and brought the practice of Streamean worship with them, enforcing it in every kingdom across Granadia. Any who would not bend knee were simply conquered.

Ostania, they left alone until they had cemented their rule, but over time and for their own purposes they’ve since stretched themselves into Ostanian lands. And so we have what brings us to what Denestia has become over the past thousand years.

But that is for another history lesson.

 

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Author Interview : Darlene Foster

Today’s guest is Darlene Foster who has taken on the challenge of writing books for youngsters. Something I wish I could do, but I could never find that voice.

Terry C Simpson: What is your book about?

Darlene Foster: My books are travel adventure stories for middle readers (approximately 8 – 12 year olds)  They are about an average, bored young girl who wishes for travel and adventure as she blows out the candles on her twelfth birthday. Her wish comes true when she receives airline tickets to visit her Aunt and Uncle in the United Arab Emirates, halfway around the world. Once there she meets Leah, an English girl, and before she knows it they are in the middle of an adventure that involves a runaway princess, evil bounty hunters, a loyal camel and a dangerous sand storm. She often finds herself wishing she were home enjoying her boring but safe life, but feels compelled to unravel the secrets of the perfume flask.  Leah and Amanda become BFFs and decide to meet again in Spain.   There Amanda encounters a mysterious young girl who looks like she stepped out of a famous painting and can’t resist helping her and her beloved pony escape the clutches of a mean horse-dealer as they trek across sunny Spain.  Amanda just can’t keep her nose out of other people’s problems and it always gets her in trouble.

Terry C Simpson: What inspired you to write this particular story?

Darlene Foster: I was invited to visit a good friend of mine who was working in the UAE.  It was a trip of a lifetime.  I found the country, people and culture fascinating and felt the need to share my experience in a story.  When I was able to write the experience through the eyes of a twelve year old, it was much more fun.

Terry C Simpson: What writer influenced you the most?

Darlene Foster: I read a lot and always have.  I was lucky as we didn’t have a TV on the farm I grew up on, so my entertainment was books.  My favourite authors were Lucy Maude Montgomery and Louisa May Alcott, because they wrote about strong young girls.  I am also a huge fan of Jane Austen but didn’t start reading her until I was in my early thirties.  Again, I am attracted to how she depicts her strong female characters.  (Sorry, you asked for one writer and I gave you three)

Terry C Simpson: Tell us a little about your main characters. Who was your favorite? Why?

Darlene Foster: So glad you asked.  My favourite character is Amanda because she is taken so out of her comfort zone and has to rely on her resourcefulness to get her out of some tight spots.  I feel she is very real; naïve, inquisitive and feisty. Leah is much worldlier and makes a good balance.  The relationship between the two girls develops nicely in the series. In some ways they are very different but they are both from single children families so they become almost like sisters. (which includes disagreeing at times)

Terry C Simpson: How long did it take you to write your book?

Darlene Foster: The first book took me three years to write and five years to find a publisher.  I soon learned that writing the book was the easy part.

Terry C Simpson: How much of a story do you have in mind before you start writing it?

Darlene Foster: I have general idea and a very rough outline, that changes many times.  Ideas just seem to materialize as I write, or as I am driving, doing housework or walking on the beach.  I can be watching TV or a movie with my husband and jump up suddenly to jot down an idea.

Terry C Simpson: What is your goal for the book, ie: what do you want people to take with them after they finish reading the story?

Darlene Foster: My goal is for young people to learn more about a place and culture they may not be able to visit themselves, while being entertained at the same time.  I hope my books encourage children to want to know more about the world and perhaps be inspired to visit other places and to step out of their comfort zone.

Terry C Simpson: What was the most difficult part about writing the book?

Darlene Foster: Finding blocks of uninterrupted time. Once I get started the ideas flow but I don’t have much spare time to write.

Terry C Simpson: What’s your writing schedule like? Do you strive for a certain amount of words each day?

Darlene Foster: I write two hours a day, after work and after dinner with my husband.  This includes marketing and research.  I am very goal oriented so I set attainable goals like completing one chapter a month.

Terry C Simpson: What’s been the most surprising part of being a writer?

Darlene Foster: Actually being able to call myself a published writer!

Terry C Simpson: What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

Darlene Foster: Never give up.  If you have story to tell, tell it.  Get help if you need it and keep writing. Like everything else, practice makes perfect.  Enter contests, submit to magazines and anthologies. Join writer’s groups. Think outside the box when it comes to publishing and never give up.

Terry C Simpson: What advice would you give other novelists about book promotion?

Darlene Foster: It is important to network and become part of the social media. If people don’t know about you and your book, they aren’t going to buy it or tell other people about it.

Terry C Simpson: How have you marketed and promoted your work?

Darlene Foster: I do readings and signings locally, send press releases to newspapers, blog, am active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc. and occasionally get interviewed by nice folks like you.  I have also joined writer’s organizations which have been a huge help as there is strength in numbers and writers are so amazingly supportive of each other.

Terry C Simpson: What words would you like to leave the world when you are gone?

Darlene Foster: Never give up on your dreams!

Terry C Simpson: Have you written any other books

Darlene Foster: Amanda in Spain-The Girl in the Painting is the second of the series and I am working on Amanda in England-The Missing Novel.  I have also had some short stories included in anthologies.

Terry C Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

Darlene Foster: http://www.ireadiwrite.com/Books/Amanda%20in%20Arabia/ and www.darlenefoster.ca

BUY LINKS :

Amazon
Barnes & Noble

 
 

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Author Interview : Margaret Millmore

Today’s Author interview is Margaret Millmore. She’s also a part of the Blog-A-Licious Book launch held by Pandora at Peace from Pieces. I tend to delve into a little paranormal/horror and it being near Halloween, I took a peek at her work and scheduled her for an interview.

Terry C. Simpson: What is your book about?

Margaret Millmore: It’s a psychological thriller/suspense with a paranormal twist based in San Francisco.

Terry C. Simpson: What inspired you to write this particular story?

Margaret Millmore: The basic idea had been with me for a long time, so I started with that (a person waking up without any memory of their recent life), but it expanded and turned into what it is today due to something my father-in-law said (my website recites the story of that incident).

Terry C. Simpson: What writer influenced you the most?

Margaret Millmore: That’s a tough one. My earliest love was CS Lewis’ Narnia books, but I’ve been a die-hard Stephen King, Ray Bradbury and Dean Koontz fan for as long as I can remember. I read a great deal, and almost every author I read inspires me.

Terry C. Simpson: Tell us a little about your main characters. Who was your favorite? Why?

Margaret Millmore: Jane is my protagonist, then her husband Michael, a mysterious man she doesn’t know and then her friends Brett and Kira, who she relies on to help her through her tragic memory loss. Jane is my favorite, I wanted to make her a strong, pragmatic person, who was faced with an impossible situation, but uses her positive and practical sensibilities to get through it, and of course she had to show a little vulnerability too (after all, no one is that strong….).

Terry C. Simpson: How long did it take you to write your book?

Margaret Millmore: It took about 4 months to write the first draft and with revisions and edits, I probably spent a little over a year on it.

Terry C. Simpson: How much of a story do you have in mind before you start writing it?

Margaret Millmore: That’s hard to define, in the case of Doppelganger Experiment it was an old idea that got me started, but it wasn’t really going anywhere until my father-in-law made a mysterious comment, which spurred my imagination into overdrive and got the story going again. Usually it’s a small thing that gets my imagination going, once that small thing triggers something I write it down and hope it grows.

Terry C. Simpson: What is your goal for the book, ie: what do you want people to take with them after they finish reading the story?

Margaret Millmore: Mostly I want to entertain them, take them away from their daily lives for a while, give them something they can’t put down, a character they can feel something about.

Terry C. Simpson: What was the most difficult part about writing the book?

Margaret Millmore: Waking up in the middle of the night with an idea for the book and knowing you have no choice but to get up and start writing.

Terry C. Simpson: What’s your writing schedule like? Do you strive for a certain amount of words each day?

Margaret Millmore: My goal is to get up at 6, coffee, shower and at my desk by 7. I try to address promotional issues for about an hour and then get to writing for 4 to 6 hours, I don’t really strive for word or chapter counts. This only works out about half the time, but at least it’s a goal…

Terry C. Simpson: What’s been the most surprising part of being a writer?

Margaret Millmore: How much I love doing it, it’s hard work, but I never thought I’d love working like this.

Terry C. Simpson: What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

Margaret Millmore: Don’t give up! Write your book, edit and revise as many times as needed until its perfect. Use all the resources around, the internet can provide you with so much advice from how to write, to how to find an agent or publisher. Don’t let the frustration and rejections get you down, it will take a while, but you can do it!

Terry C. Simpson: What advice would you give other novelists about book promotion?

Margaret Millmore: I think the promoting part is harder than the writing part. Use social media, join writing groups, friends and family are a great way to spread the word for your new book, basically be shameless, tell everyone and ask them to tell their friends!

Terry C. Simpson: How have you marketed and promoted your work?

Margaret Millmore: All of the things I mentioned in 12 above, honestly I know there are more ways to promote, but I’m pretty new at this, so I’m still learning.

Terry C. Simpson: What words would you like to leave the world when you are gone?

Margaret Millmore: Books are doorways to the imagination, they teach you new things, take you to new cities, countries and worlds, they introduce you to a never ending supply of characters and they entertain you far beyond what TV and video games can do. Never stop reading!

Terry C. Simpson: Have you written any other books?

Margaret Millmore: I have a completed novel that I wrote 3 years ago, after trying for a while to get it published, I decided it needed to fester for a while and I had other ideas that wanted out of my head, so I moved on to the Doppelganger Experiment. I’m hoping to revisit that book someday soon, it just might be time.

Terry C. Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

Margaret Millmore: My website www.margaretmillmore.com, also major on-line retailers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Smashwords, etc. You can also visit my publishers website at www.worldcastlepublishing.com

BUY LINKS:

Amazon for Kindle

Barnes & Noble for Nook

Smashwords for epub for other apps Ipad etc.

 
 

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Author Interview : Jodie Brownlee

Today’s Author interview is Jodie Brownlee. She’s part of the Blog-A-Licious Book launch held by Pandora at Peace from Pieces. Today, it’s time for some YA.

Terry C. Simpson: What is your book about?

Jodie Brownlee: The Ruby trilogy is a fantasy adventure series for middle grade children.

Granny McQuirky uses the traveler’s telescope to teleport into another world. While she is away, Ruby’s house-proud mother gives the telescope a polish and knocks the settings out. Ruby and her friends try to put it right, but accidentally zap Mrs Pinkus and her poodle into the other world. When they follow to retrieve her, they bring back more than they bargained for and Granny McQuirky is blamed for the resulting crimes. Ruby and her friends must find the real criminal before Granny is sentenced to life in a bottle, but at every turn, a mysterious enemy threatens Ruby’s life.

Terry C. Simpson: What inspired you to write this particular story?

Jodie Brownlee: I wrote the kind of story I would have loved to read when I was ten. It’s a blend of mystery, adventure, comedy, light horror, the real and the magical. I also wanted a strong female protagonist who inspired girls to live bravely, to be a loyal friend, and to explore.

Terry C. Simpson: What writer influenced you the most?

Jodie Brownlee: It’s hard to narrow it down to one, but I will go with Tolkien. Bilbo’s transformation from a homey hobbit to a hero, his adventures and impossible quest, and Tolkien’s well crafted world, had me reading The Hobbit over and over again.

Terry C. Simpson: Tell us a little about your main characters. Who was your favorite? Why?

Jodie Brownlee: There are three friends; Avalon a genie, Jaffa a well-read Persian boy, and Ruby the protagonist from a suburb in the western world. They each have their talents and weaknesses, but together they are formidable, though they don’t realize it. Their friendship and loyalty, and Ruby’s ability to unite different people to a common cause, is what saves the entire genie population.

My favorite character is Ruby. She doesn’t seem to have any talent at all, is not always obedient, and is often plagued with self-doubt, but she has courage, loyalty, leadership qualities and a good heart.

Terry C. Simpson: How long did it take you to write your book?

Jodie Brownlee: One year from beginning to publication.

Terry C. Simpson: How much of a story do you have in mind before you start writing it?

I toy around with a few ideas on paper first, but I wouldn’t call this writing. ‘Sketching’ out ideas is more apt. I research the subject and sketch out the key points – a problem, an inciting incident, the climax, the ending – then I jot down twenty or so key scenes. Once this is down I have enough to work with and I start to write the story, continuing to jot rough scenes and research as I go.

Terry C. Simpson: What is your goal for the book, ie: what do you want people to take with      them after they finish reading the story?

I want children to value friendship and loyalty. I want to encourage them to live bravely, to be curious, and to live life as though it were a big bold adventure.

Terry C. Simpson: What was the most difficult part about writing the book?

Jodie Brownlee: The most difficult part was in knowing whether my writing was any good or not. Self-doubt is the writer’s number one enemy. It is the culprit behind writer’s block, the reason for not prioritizing your time to include writing, and is the root of a million other afflictions.

Terry C. Simpson: What’s your writing schedule like? Do you strive for a certain amount of words each day?

Jodie Brownlee: I write a plan which includes goals, key performance indicators and deadlines. Goals are what I call big things like ‘complete book X by this date’. Key performance indicators are the small achievements which act as stepping stones towards my goal: For example ‘draft one complete in six months’, ‘final draft in 8 months’, ‘query letter to 5 literary agents by this date’, and so on.

I don’t have a word count or specified hours to work, as long as I meet my deadlines. Sometimes this means working nights and weekends to get it done. I don’t have a problem with wasting time because it is my habit to wake up and sit at my computer until 5.30pm. I clear my emails and set up my tweets in the first two hours. After that I try not to let social media distract me until the following morning. (‘Try’ being the operative word!)

Terry C. Simpson: What’s been the most surprising part of being a writer?

Jodie Brownlee: The reaction of other people when I tell them I am a writer. It varies from complete indifference to almost celebrity worship. No other occupation (and I have had many) has elicited such varied and extreme responses.

Terry C. Simpson: What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Jodie Brownlee: 1. You spend a year or so on your manuscript. Spend extra time on your query letter, too, so that agents will want to see that manuscript.

2. Where you are now as a writer, will not be where you are in six months or a year from now. You will grow as you master your craft. Just because one manuscript is roundly rejected, does not mean the next one will be.

Terry C. Simpson: What advice would you give other novelists about book promotion?

Jodie Brownlee: Set aside time for promotion and time for your writing. Don’t let promotion take over and prevent you from writing the next book. Balance is essential.

Join a supportive network so that you can all cross-promote. There are many on Facebook and I am a member of Author Central, Amrita, Indie Authors International, Kindelmojo, and Celebrating Authors. Of course, I only have enough time to interact on one or two of these.

Interact before shameless promotion.  Don’t drop into a group broadcasting your new book. The group doesn’tknow you yet, and you don’t know them. It’s rude and no one will pay any attention to you. Interact first. Tweet other people’s books. Retweet their promotional tweets. Then they’ll do the same for you. It takes time but it’s worth it, both for the friendships and the promotion.

Terry C. Simpson: How have you marketed and promoted your work?

Jodie Brownlee: I network with other writers on Facebook and Twitter. We participate in Tweet Fests, tweeting one or two members each day of the month. When your turn comes around and you get tweeted all day by 50 or more people, it’s a great feeling! It’s also good to know you’re helping to give that feeling to others when it is your turn to tweet them. We also participate in launching each other’s new releases by blogging, tweeting, and by ‘liking’ their author pages and book page on Amazon.

Terry C. Simpson: What words would you like to leave the world when you are gone?

Jodie Brownlee: I’m moving into new themes with the YA books which address death, change and the acceptance of change but without getting too heavy. The words I would like to leave the world have actually already been left by Lao Tzu “What the caterpillar calls the end, the rest of the world calls a butterfly.”

Terry C. Simpson: Have you written any other books

Jodie Brownlee: I have written three for middle grade readers: The Magic Carpet, The Traveler’s Telescope, and The Doomsday Curse.

I am part way through two YA coming of age novels: Liberty Smith, set in Mississippi, and The Gown and Globe, set in London.

Terry C. Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

Jodie Brownlee: My website http://www.jodiebrownlee.com

From here visitors can connect with me via email, twitter, goodreads, and facebook.

Twitter name: @JodieBrownlee

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jodie-Brownlee-writer/105517319539522

Amazon USA: http://amzn.com/B005H8B97I

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005H8B97I

 
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Posted by on October 23, 2011 in Authors, Epublishing, Interviews, Writing

 

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Author Interview : Shay Fabbro

Today’s Author Interview hails from my favorite genre of scifi/fantasy. She’s in quite a few of the same groups as I on facebook, and it has been a pleasure knowing her. Introducing Shay Fabbro, a 2011 Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist:

Terry C. Simpson: What is your book about?

Shay Fabbro: The Chosen is the first of a scifi/fantasy trilogy. The Chosen are a special group of beings from four different planets (Earth is one) that have an enormous burden to bear: they must find a way to save the galaxy from the Mekan Hoard.

Terry C. Simpson: What inspired you to write this particular story?

Shay Fabbro: I had a dream while I was in graduate school that I couldn’t stop thinking about. It was maddening at times! I had all these questions about the man and the camel and the damn big machine that was descending on them. Once I started answering the questions and making up a back story, I realized I had something big going on.

Terry C. Simpson: What writer influenced you the most?

Shay Fabbro: I would have to say Tolkein, George RR Martin, and maybe a little Jim Butcher thrown in.

Terry C. Simpson: Tell us a little about your main characters. Who was your favorite? Why?

Shay Fabbro: I have a lot of main characters so I’ll tell you about my favorite planet. It’s the planet Volgon which houses a fierce reptilian warrior race. Their lives have been shaped by thousands of years of war, forcing them to live an existence based on survival alone. The decisions they must make seem cruel and heartless to outsiders, but they know that only the strong can help fight their enemy. It’s only when they meet their fellow Chosen that they realize that physical strength isn’t the only kind of strength.

Terry C. Simpson: How long did it take you to write your book?

Shay Fabbro:  It took me about 5 years to complete the first draft. I was in grad school at the time so that didn’t leave me much time to write J

Terry C. Simpson: How much of a story do you have in mind before you start writing it?

Shay Fabbro:  I actually filled a spiral notebook with all sorts of information about my different planets, characters, cultures, history, maps, lay-outs of the villages and towns, cool names I could pick from. I spent about a year on the planning stage before I ever wrote a sentence of chapter one.

Terry C. Simpson: What is your goal for the book, ie: what do you want people to take with them after they finish reading the story?

Shay Fabbro: There are a lot of things I hope people take from the book, and especially the series as a whole. The series will make people question the idea of destiny/fate versus free will. I want to delve into the notion of those that believe that each decision we make was already preordained, and those that believe our destiny is what we make it, that we succeed because we don’t give up. The various planets also gives rise to some very interesting internal conflicts between members of various alien races. They are so very different but I show that through a common enemy (the Mekans), they manage to work through their differences to vanquish their foe.

Terry C. Simpson: What was the most difficult part about writing the book?

Shay Fabbro:  I had a pretty easy time getting the story down. I had synopses for all three books written before I started on The Chosen. But it’s the fine-tuning I have a hard time with. When my editor suggests trimming some stuff, I feel like I am cutting on a body part! Each word seems necessary at the time but I am learning to say more with less. Although I do still tend to get a little wordy with some stuff 😉

Terry C. Simpson: What’s your writing schedule like? Do you strive for a certain amount of words each day?

Shay Fabbro: I write when I have time. I refuse to set goals. I am a biology professor at Colorado Mesa University and am busy with lectures, writing textbooks and lab manuals, grading, etc. I write novels because it’s fun. The minute I start forcing myself to write X number of words a day, I fear the fun will be lost.

Terry C. Simpson: What’s been the most surprising part of being a writer?

Shay Fabbro: How many people there are out there that truly support Indie authors, people such as yourself that will take the time to post interviews and guest posts, all to help us get the word about our books. It’s fantastic!

Terry C. Simpson: What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

Shay Fabbro: To be prepared for a tough road. NO author ever “makes it” instantly. Whether you go the more traditional route and opt to find an agent or whether you decide to find a small press, or even self-publish, there are frustrations and heartache with each choice.

Terry C. Simpson: What advice would you give other novelists about book promotion?

Shay Fabbro: Start before you finish the book! I can’t stress this enough. So many authors mistakenly think they can’t start a Facebook fanpage, Twitter account, website, or blog until AFTER their book launches. Nothing could be further from the truth. Authors need to start early to build a following, send out teasers in the form of sample chapters and cover art, doing blog tours, holding contests for free books, anything to get the word out! Start building those relationships with people, interact with them (don’t just spam with buybuybuy my book). And pay the kindness forward for other Indie authors.

Terry C. Simpson: How have you marketed and promoted your work?

Shay Fabbro: I do local signings, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, website, guest blogs and interviews, various contests.

Terry C. Simpson: What words would you like to leave the world when you are gone?

Shay Fabbro: To never give up on your dreams.

Terry C. Simpson: Have you written any other books?

Shay Fabbro: I have four books out currently: The Chosen (Book One of the Portals of Destiny), Shattered Destiny (Book Two of the Portals of Destiny), The Mad Lord Lucian (Portals of Destiny Novella), Dangerous Reflections (Adventures of Alexis Davenport, Book One).

Terry C. Simpson: Where can people learn more about your books?

Shay Fabbro: They can visit my website http://shayfabbro.com/ for sample chapters from all my books as well as author interviews, reviews, etc.

BUY LINKS:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2011 in Authors, Epublishing, Interviews, Writing

 

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Mater – The Magic of Denestia

What follows are some of the basics around the magic I created for Denestia.

And for the curious, I chose the name Mater for its Latin meaning of mother because that is in essence what it represents, the mother of all things in my world.

Mater is the core elemental power which exists within everything. It makes up the three elements the gods represent and their individual essences. Mater is more than just the elements driving one world. It drives all worlds.

The three elements are the solids of the Forms, the liquids of the Flows, and the energy of the Streams. Those are further broken down into separate essences e.g Earth, wood and metal are a part of the Forms. Fire, heat, cold, light and shade are a part of the Streams. Water, wind, air are a part of the Flows. Then there’s sela essence, a combination of life and death which sits outside the three elements and is required for anything to live or die.

This also provides a connection and backdrop to the three main religions: Streamean, Formist and Flowic. And they all have connections to their gods and to Mater.

Mater is more than just magic, it’s compromised of living entities. These entities range from malevolent to good. One constant remains for them is that in order to live, they like us, must feed. They feed on sela essence. In order to gain sela something must die. These entities inhabit people, plants, or creatures strong enough to use the actual forces given off by the essences in physical or mental acts in what’s called Forging.

However, once one has Forged, it affects your psyche and slowly begins to drive you insane and causes your own sela to begin leaking from you. To stem the tide of this effect and stabilize the mind and body, one is forced to kill to feed Mater itself. This cycle continues until you go completely insane, unleash all your power and die. In turn the entities of Mater get what they want. To feed.

There is a way to nullify this process on a whole by being strong enough to force the entities into what’s called your Shunyata, your core. It is the place where your sela is held. There, the entities can feed off you and you can use their power without the bad aftereffects.

Mater is also linked to the Matus, (one who can use Mater), emotionally. Strong emotions can trigger its use and the entities then use that in a form of bloodlust to encourage the Matus to kill. The main extremes of emotions like rage, love, intense fear, grief and being overjoyed reflect the state of the entities and what they represent from malevolent for the darker emotions to benevolence for the lighter ones. This is also another function of the Shunyata or the Eye as it”s called in some places. To gain emotional control of oneself, you attain the Shunyata. However, the Matus cannot always remain in the Shunyata because the entities will deplete their sela to such an extent, the Matus will either go insane and die or both. Using too much Mater or doing a Forging that’s beyond the Matus’ means can tear the aura that surrounds his body and cause his sela to begin leaking. An aura is a type of container that surrounds  anything containing sela and shows the attributes of Mater they can touch, and furthermore can reflect their intentions and emotional states for those with such an ability to read the aura. The only way to heal that process is to enter a special place called an Entosis that holds primordial elements of Mater. There are very few of these places in the world, and only the strongest Matii can enter them.

Mater can be imbued into items called divya that those who weren’t strong enough to actually Forge, can wield. Divya serve many different purposes and come in many different forms. From helping with mundane tasks such as blacksmithing to use as weapons against certain enemies. Mater can also be imbued into living creatures and men. This is a special type of imbuing called Etching and only a creature from the Nether can use this power. The Nether is where the gods are currently banished to, and is where the world and Mater originated.

There are other rules governing Mater called the Principles. And there are Tenets applied to each essence. These are supposed to be followed, but very few know their full meaning.

The first Principle of Mater is: The elements must exist in harmony.

Examples of Tenets:
The Tenet of Light reads: “Light to balance shade. Light to show honor. Honor to show mercy,”
The Tenet of Shade reads: “Shade to balance light. Mercy to gift death. Death to those found wanting.”

 

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